Communist Republicans and the Reality of Torture

From the NYT 

The article describes basic Soviet N.K.V.D. (later K.G.B.) methods: isolation in a small cell; constant light; sleep deprivation; cold or heat; reduced food rations. Soviets denied such treatment was torture, just as American officials have in recent years:

The effects of isolation, anxiety, fatigue, lack of sleep, uncomfortable temperatures, and chronic hunger produce disturbances of mood, attitudes and behavior in nearly all prisoners. The living organism cannot entirely withstand such assaults. The Communists do not look upon these assaults as “torture.” But all of them produce great discomfort, and lead to serious disturbances of many bodily processes; there is no reason to differentiate them from any other form of torture.

Interrogators looked for ways to increase the pressure, including “stress positions”:

Another [technique] widely used is that of requiring the prisoner to stand throughout the interrogation session or to maintain some other physical position which becomes painful. This, like other features of the KGB procedure, is a form of physical torture, in spite of the fact that the prisoners and KGB officers alike do not ordinarily perceive it as such. Any fixed position which is maintained over a long period of time ultimately produces excruciating pain.

Overt brutality was discouraged, as it was at American facilities:

The KGB hardly ever uses manacles or chains, and rarely resorts to physical beatings. The actual physical beating is, of course, repugnant to overt Communist principles and is contrary to K.G.B. regulations.

Closed trials and military tribunals were standard, as at Guantánamo:

Prisoners are tried before “military tribunals,” which are not public courts. Those present are only the interrogator, the state prosecutor, the prisoner, the judges, a few stenographers, and perhaps a few officers of the court.

The Bush administration concluded that the Geneva Conventions did not apply to Qaeda detainees. Similarly, the Soviets argued that international rules did not apply to foreign detainees:

In typical Communist legalistic fashion, the N.K.V.D. rationalized its use of torture and pressure in the interrogation of prisoners of war. When it desired to use such methods against a prisoner or to obtain from him a propaganda statement or “confession,” it simply declared the prisoner a “war-crimes uspect” and informed him that, therefore, he was not subject to international rules governing the treatment of prisoners of war.

Communist-style interrogation routinely produced false confessions:

The cumulative effects of the entire experience may be almost intolerable. [The prisoner] becomes mentally dull and loses his capacity for discrimination. He becomes malleable and suggestible, and in some instances he may confabulate. By suggesting that the prisoner accept half-truths and plausible distortions of the truth, [the interrogator] makes it possible for the prisoner to rationalize and thus accept the interrogator’s viewpoint as the only way out of an intolerable situation.

Andrew Sullivan quoted this and replaced the words Communist with Republican.  It is amazing how quickly our country can devolve.

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2 responses to “Communist Republicans and the Reality of Torture

  1. I appreciate the Communists for being pretty clear about what they are doing; did you catch what Putin stated about the use and construction of a missile defense system in Europe by the U.S. Can you see the whole Cold War, CIA, KGB, and arms race starting again? That would suck seeing that we already have an enemy that is difficult to catch.What is the Geneva Convention these days; it seems that the rules keep changing. Boy the world has become a very unstable place over the past 8 years.

  2. Oh, man, that’s a really good point about the current Putin-run Russia vs. the Bush-run US. Putin is instating a near fascist regime. And, Bush is not exactly a freedom lover. Both are “stick to my guns” leaders, and that’s never good for diplomacy.
    For instance: I worry about US-Russia relations more than US-China relations. China certainly has “world-domination plans”, but they’re likely of the Japanese/American/economic kind. But, at least they HAVE a plan. I am not convinced Russia has any kind of cohesive foreign policy. And with a leader like Putin in office, that unpredictability can be dangerous.

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